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Position: PhD Studentship: Modelling Light alloy automotive component Manufacture
Institution: University College London
Department: Mechanical Engineering
Location: London, United Kingdom
Duties: The project is based at the Research Complex at Harwell in Oxfordshire (RCaH, Fig.1), with experiments in the labs as well as in the beamlines at Diamond Light Source. The study involves designing and performing world unique synchrotron experiments, revealing new fundamental insights into microstructural feature formation, producing high impact publications. You will need to travel to Ford USA and IITB. You will be part of a team of students and postdocs in the EPSRC MAPP Future Manufacturing Hub (www.mapp.ac.uk)
Requirements: Applicants should ideally have a first class undergraduate degree (or equivalent) in Mechanical, Materials, Physics, Mathematics or a related discipline. The position is open to students on Home fees. Excellent organizational, interpersonal and communication skills, along with a stated interest in interdisciplinary research, are essential. see https://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate/apply-graduate-study/what-you-need Experience in programming, experimental design, image analysis, and materials science would be beneficial. Fluent spoken and written English in accordance with UCL English requirements (TOEFL>92 or IELTS>6.5)
   
Text: PhD Studentship: Modelling Light alloy automotive component Manufacture, - Ref:1728573 Click here to go back to search results UCL Department / Division Mechanical Engineering Location of position UK non-UCL site Location of the work (non-UCL site) Harwell, Oxfordshire Duration of Studentship Four years Stipend ?18,000 per annum Vacancy Information Outstanding applicants are invited to apply for an industrially co-funded PhD studentship in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at University College London, supervised by Professor Peter Lee. Studentship Description The project is based at the Research Complex at Harwell in Oxfordshire (RCaH, Fig.1), with experiments in the labs as well as in the beamlines at Diamond Light Source. The study involves designing and performing world unique synchrotron experiments, revealing new fundamental insights into microstructural feature formation, producing high impact publications. You will need to travel to Ford USA and IITB. You will be part of a team of students and postdocs in the EPSRC MAPP Future Manufacturing Hub ( www.mapp.ac.uk ). Being a PhD student at UCL, one of the world?s top multidisciplinary universities, you will benefit from state-of-the-art mechanical engineering research training, high performance computing, experimental laboratories and combined supervision by world leading scientists in engineering, materials, and synchrotron imaging. Person Specification ? Applicants should ideally have a first class undergraduate degree (or equivalent) in Mechanical, Materials, Physics, Mathematics or a related discipline. ? The position is open to students on Home fees. ? Excellent organizational, interpersonal and communication skills, along with a stated interest in interdisciplinary research, are essential. see https://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate/apply-graduate-study/what-you-need ? Experience in programming, experimental design, image analysis, and materials science would be beneficial. ? Fluent spoken and written English in accordance with UCL English requirements (TOEFL> 92 or IELTS> 6.5). Eligibility Eligible applicants should contact Prof. Peter Lee ( peter.lee@ucl.ac.uk ) enclosing a cover letter (including the names and contact details of two referees), one-page research statement, transcripts and a CV. Contact name Monique Conybeare Contact details m.conybeare@ucl.ac.uk UCL Taking Action for Equality Closing Date 30 Jun 2018 Latest time for the submission of applications 23:59 Studentship Description
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